Bruins

With a top-6 spot up for grabs, Danton Heinen fine tuning his shot this summer in hopes of turning corner offensively

(Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)

Like many of his Bruins teammates, Danton Heinen isn’t spending much time looking in the rearview mirror at what as an extended Stanley Cup run that ended in heartbreak last month.

While Heinen and the rest of Boston’s younger crop of skaters will benefit from the experience gained by a two-and-a-half month campaign in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, they certainly won’t be keen on looking over too much game film from their disheartening defeat at the hands of the Blues. 

Heinen in particular has a few clips that he’d likely want to scrub from his memory. 

The 24-year-old forward did form part of a dynamic third line with Charlie Coyle and Marcus Johansson that did combine for seven 5v5 goals over 22 postseason games together, but Heinen did leave quite a bit to be desired in the Cup Final against the Blues — notching one assist and landing just eight shots on goal over the span of the seven-game series. 

The toughest sequence for Heinen came in Game 6 of the Cup Final, as Charlie McAvoy sprung Heinen on a breakaway against Jordan Binnington off of a fantastic feed. While a trailing Alex Pietrangelo didn’t make things any easier for Heinen, he was unable to get the puck on net during the Grade-A look, ultimately whiffing on the shot. 

It was one of the final chapters in what was an overall frustrating season for Heinen in terms of offensive production, ultimately ranking seventh on the club in scoring with 34 points over 77 games. 

While he projects as more as a steady, two-way forward that’s not going to be vying for the Art Ross at any point in the future, Heinen would be the first to admit that a 34-point campaign is not going to cut it — especially after ranking ninth amongst all NHL rookies in scoring (47 points) in 2017-18.

Now back in the fold with a new, two-year contract extension and with the potential of more playing time on the horizon, Heinen is determined to prove that he’s much more than just a key cog in a bottom-six role.